Reduce Anxiety & Panic Attacks 2017-06-21T23:39:28+00:00

Reduce Anxiety & Panic Attacks

Anxiety can take many forms, from a vague uncomfortable feeling to a full blown disabling anxiety that may lead on to panic attacks, fears, phobias and lack of confidence. Anxiety is made up of three elements: the physical sensation you experience, the emotions you have while experiencing them and the thoughts that go through your mind. There are two major causes of anxiety – chronic stress and the misuse of our imagination. To understand anxiety, we also need to Understand Stress.

Anxiety

Anxiety can take many forms, from a vague uncomfortable feeling to a full blown disabling anxiety that may lead on to panic attacks, fears, phobias and lack of confidence. Anxiety is made up of three elements: the physical sensation you experience, the emotions you have while experiencing them and the thoughts that go through your mind. There are two major causes of anxiety – chronic stress and the misuse of our imagination. To understand anxiety, we also need to Understand Stress.

Symptoms of Panic Attacks: When someone experiences a full blown Panic Attack it is extremely terrifying. A person may experience a pounding heart, copious sweating, dry mouth, shallow breathing, nausea and a sense of needing to go to the toilet. This is followed with a sensation of shortness of breath or choking. The person then starts gasping and panting, (hyperventilating) and the fear of panic and dying exacerbates the process which actually makes the problem worse. The symptoms that occur are in fact the fight-or-flight response that is unconsciously set in motion when we feel under threat. However, most people experience panic attacks in shopping centres or supermarkets where there is no real threat as there is no-one to fight and nowhere to run. These places just happen to be the place a person is in when an intolerable load of stresses, put together, suddenly rise above a level they feel they can cope with.

As the first time this happens it is very frightening, the brain remembers this for future pattern-matching purposes. Our brain (the amygdala) wants to protect us from harm, so the next time you are in a similar place, the amygdala using our senses does a pattern match and, low and behold you have a panic attack. A panic attack that occurs when there is no real emergency is like a smoke alarm that is so sensitive that it goes off when there is not a real fire. The person involved may wonder what is happening, then realises there is no fire so they can turn off the alarm. Nothing dire happens as a result. The Rewind Technique, which is so successful in resolving symptoms of post traumatic stress, is also highly effective in bringing down the emotional arousal associated with past panic attacks.